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Revision to Connecting and configuring fans

Tony

== Always-on fans ==
 
The Duet 0.8.5 and Duet WiFi2 provide two connectors for fans that should be on any time the power is on. Many setup guides suggest this is how you should wire your hot end fan (but see thermostatic fans, below) to prevent heat from creeping back and melting the filament, jamming the hot end. You may also wish to attach a fan to move air across the underside of the Duet WiFi2, keeping the stepper drivers cool. Simply plug any such fan into one of these sockets, connecting the red wire to V_FAN and the black wire to GND.
The Duet 0.8.5 and Duet WiFi2 provide two connectors for fans that should be on any time the power is on. Many setup guides suggest this is how you should wire your hot end fan (but see thermostatic fans, below) to prevent heat from creeping back and melting the filament, jamming the hot end. You may also wish to attach a fan to move air across the underside of the Duet WiFi2, keeping the stepper drivers cool. Simply plug any such fan into one of these sockets, connecting the red wire to V_FAN and the black wire to GND.
 
If you want to run your other fans on a Duet WiFi2 from 5V but your always-on fans from 12/24V, you can wire them directly across the power supply pins and ignore the Duet's connectors.
If you want to run your other fans on a Duet WiFi2 from 5V but your always-on fans from 12/24V, you can wire them directly across the power supply pins and ignore the Duet's connectors.
 
== Thermostatically controlled fans ==
 
As mentioned above, many hot ends require a fan to keep the heatsink cool, so that the filament remains solid until it passes through the heat break into the melt zone. This fan should be on any time the hot end is hot enough to melt plastic, but can safely be off when the hot end is cool even if the rest of the machine is on. The Duet WiFi2 supports this mode of operation. Plug your fan into one of the PWM connectors, say FAN1, and configure it as a thermostatic fan for the appopriate heater by putting the appropriate M106 G-code in config.g. For example:
As mentioned above, many hot ends require a fan to keep the heatsink cool, so that the filament remains solid until it passes through the heat break into the melt zone. This fan should be on any time the hot end is hot enough to melt plastic, but can safely be off when the hot end is cool even if the rest of the machine is on. The Duet WiFi2 supports this mode of operation. Plug your fan into one of the PWM connectors, say FAN1, and configure it as a thermostatic fan for the appopriate heater by putting the appropriate M106 G-code in config.g. For example:
 
'''M106 P1 T45 H1'''
 
This sets fan 1 to run any time the temperature of heater 1 is above 45 Celsius. See [http://reprap.org/wiki/G-code#M106:_Fan_On] for details. We recommend you use the FAN1 connector for a thermostatically-controlled hot end fan, because on the Duet WiFi2 it defaults to being on at power up, to provide maximum safety if you restart your Duet when the hot end is hot.
This sets fan 1 to run any time the temperature of heater 1 is above 45 Celsius. See [http://reprap.org/wiki/G-code#M106:_Fan_On] for details. We recommend you use the FAN1 connector for a thermostatically-controlled hot end fan, because on the Duet WiFi2 it defaults to being on at power up, to provide maximum safety if you restart your Duet when the hot end is hot.
 
A thermostatically controlled hot end fan will be turned on automatically when you auto tune any heater that it monitors.

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