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Introduction

In the previous guide, we mounted the Duet Maestro board inside the Ender 3 and connected all the wires.

Before we can use the Duet, we need to provide it with configuration information specific to the printer.

This guide will go through how to obtain the needed information, and how to go through the online configuration tool to generate a set of config files that will work with the Ender 3.

Even though this guide is specific to the Ender 3, the general principles remain the same for other printers, and could be used as a basis for adapting printers.

Other guides in this series:

Download Completed Config Files Here

If you'd like to skip using the configurator, or would like something to compare your result against, you can download the complete config set and slicer profiles here: https://github.com/x0rtrunks/Ender3DuetM...

  1. Before we can properly configure the Duet with RepRapFirmware, we must gather a list of parameters that define the mechanical operation of the printer itself. This information can be found in multiple places and will vary from printer to printer. In the case of the Ender 3 Pro, Creality provides a download for the Marlin configuration used. You can download the Creality Ender 3 Marlin Config here: https://www.creality3d.cn/download/sourc...
    • Before we can properly configure the Duet with RepRapFirmware, we must gather a list of parameters that define the mechanical operation of the printer itself. This information can be found in multiple places and will vary from printer to printer.

    • In the case of the Ender 3 Pro, Creality provides a download for the Marlin configuration used. You can download the Creality Ender 3 Marlin Config here: https://www.creality3d.cn/download/sourc...

    • The SD card that came with your printer may also include a copy of the Marlin files. The Marlin file we require is Configuration.h.

    • Some of this information can also be accessed via the LCD menu on the printer if you already have it up and running.

    • See this article for more information on what information you will need and how to obtain it.

  2. The more details we know about the physical, electrical, and mechanical aspects of the printer, the easier it will be to complete the configurator. It can help to write these values down for future reference. This guide assumes you are using the stock Ender 3 kit, and have it wired to the Duet Maestro as shown in the previous guide.
    • The more details we know about the physical, electrical, and mechanical aspects of the printer, the easier it will be to complete the configurator.

    • It can help to write these values down for future reference.

    • This guide assumes you are using the stock Ender 3 kit, and have it wired to the Duet Maestro as shown in the previous guide.

    • Some values are tied to the physical qualities of the printer and cannot be changed. Other values, such as speed, acceleration, and jerk can be changed to suit your requirements.

    • A future guide will go through calibration and tuning to find the best values, but for now we will use the stock values.

    • Warning! Be aware that Marlin uses mm/s for most of its speed values, while RepRapFirmware uses mm/min. The two can be converted by either multiplying or dividing by 60.

  3. Go to https://configurator.reprapfirmware.org/... to begin.
    • Go to https://configurator.reprapfirmware.org/... to begin.

    • Choose custom printer if your model isn’t already in the list.

    • The rest of the guide will go through each page and describe what we need to change to match the Ender 3.

    • Only changed values will be listed. Match your values to those shown in the screen shots.

    • At the end we will download a zip file that will replace the /sys folder on the SD card. This folder contains all the configuration files that define how the Maestro is configured and how it behaves during certain operations like homing.

  4. The General Tab is used to define a few basic starting values like which board you are using, whether to use resume on power loss functionality, the size of your build volume, and what kinematics your printer uses.
    • The General Tab is used to define a few basic starting values like which board you are using, whether to use resume on power loss functionality, the size of your build volume, and what kinematics your printer uses.

    • Make the following changes:

    • Select Duet 2 Maestro as the board

    • Check read config-override.g

    • Check save print state on power failure

    • Set the threshold values for power save as 21v and 23v

    • Maximum travel distance is X235 Y235 Z260

  5. The Motors Tab defines motor directions, sets microstepping and steps per mm, motor currents, speed, acceleration, and jerk,
    • The Motors Tab defines motor directions, sets microstepping and steps per mm, motor currents, speed, acceleration, and jerk,

    • Configure the motors page as follows:

    • X: Backwards, x16 (on), 80, 10, 150, 500, 800, 0 (X)

    • Y: Backwards, x16 (on), 80, 10, 150, 500, 800, 1 (Y)

    • Z: Forwards, x16 (on), 400, 1, 10, 120, 800, 2 (Z)

    • E: Backwards, x16 (on), 93, 5, 100, 5000, 900, 3 (E0)

    • These values are found in the Marlin Configuration.h. Note that some slight changes have been made to bring it more in line with standard RepRapFirmware values.

    • Note that the Extruder microsteps have been set to x128 in the image. this is to increase the resolution of the extruder drive, which is rather low do to being an ungeared direct drive extruder. This is optional. The default x16 value also works and leads to a steps per mm value of ~96. Exact value to be calibrated later.

  6. The Endstops Tab defines what type of endstop switch is being used (NO/NC), and where on the printer its located (Low End/High End).
    • The Endstops Tab defines what type of endstop switch is being used (NO/NC), and where on the printer its located (Low End/High End).

    • It also defines the Z Probe. The stock Ender 3 does not come with a Z probe by default. A future guide will go through adding one.

    • The Ender 3 Pro uses Active high (NC) switches and trigger at the low end of travel (X0, Y0, Z0)

  7. The Heaters Tab defines the bed and tool heaters, and sets the parameters of the thermistors.
    • The Heaters Tab defines the bed and tool heaters, and sets the parameters of the thermistors.

    • Change the bed heater control method to PID.

    • Set the bed temp limit to 80c (limit for the magnetic bed surface)

    • Set the Nozzle temp limit to 250c (limit for the PTFE tube in the hotend)

    • Set the values for both Thermistor values as: R25 – 98801, B – 4185, R – 2200

  8. For printers with multiple tools you can use the Tools Tab to define the heater and extruder used for the tool. In the case of the Ender 3 there is only a single tool.
    • For printers with multiple tools you can use the Tools Tab to define the heater and extruder used for the tool. In the case of the Ender 3 there is only a single tool.

    • Check select First tool on start-up

    • Enter a name for the default tool if you like. This name will show up in the Duet Web Control. In this case we used the generic "HotEnd" just to differentiate it from the heat bed.

  9. This tab defines the area of the bed to be probed when using Mesh Compensation.
    • This tab defines the area of the bed to be probed when using Mesh Compensation.

    • Typically this is used with a Z Probe, but it can actually be done manually as well.

    • Even though the stock Ender 3 doesn't have a Z probe, we will define the probe area anyway just in case you add a probe in the future.

    • Set the area to be X min 10, X max 220, Y min 10, Y max 220, with a spacing of 20mm.

    • See this guide for further information on using mesh bed compensation:

    • Mesh bed compensation

  10. Give your printer a name that will show up on your network and set a password if you wish.
    • Give your printer a name that will show up on your network and set a password if you wish.

    • In order to connect to the web interface, we need to reliably know the IP address of the Duet. You have two options for this: Static IP versus Dynamic IP

    • 1. Set a static IP address in the config file of the Duet that falls within your network range, but which isn’t already used, or likely to be used by your router for another device in the future.

    • 2. Use DHCP to let the router choose a suitable IP address for the Duet and then use the Router control panel to reserve that IP address for future use by the Duet.

    • For this guide, we will be using DHCP to get an IP address from the Router as it is best practice to use DHCP to assign the address and then use the router control panel to assign the address permanently with a DHCP reservation. This prevents any possible future IP conflicts with another device on the network.

    • The steps for setting up a reservation will depend on your model of router and is outside the scope of this guide, but instructions can usually be found in the manual for the router.

  11. The final tab will configure the fans and allow you to define any additional gcode commands to add to the config file.
    • The final tab will configure the fans and allow you to define any additional gcode commands to add to the config file.

    • Click the add fan button to add Fan2

    • Fan0: Speed 0, No, 20, No (Part cooling fan)

    • Fan1: Speed 0, No, 20, Yes, E0, 45 (Hot end heat sink fan)

    • Fan2: Speed 0, No, 20, Yes, Bed/E0, 45 (Electronics case fan)

    • Custom settings: M918 P1 E4 ; Enable 12864 LCD with 1 menu item per encoder click

    • This will have the fans turn off at startup, setup Fan0 for the part cooling fan, setup Fan1 for the hot end fan to turn on automatically at 45c, and Fan2 as the case fan which will turn on automatically when either the bed or the hot end reach 45c, which is basically during a print.

    • In my testing I found that the fans are quietest and start spinning most reliably with 20hz frequency. Other fans may behave differently. If your fans have a high-pitched whine, or don’t reliably spin at low speeds, try experimenting with the fan frequency. Values from 10 to 30000 are usable. 500 is default.

  12. When finished with the fans, click Finish and you will be presented with a dialogue as shown here.
    • When finished with the fans, click Finish and you will be presented with a dialogue as shown here.

    • Use the blue button at the bottom right to download a zip file that contains all of the necessary config files.

  13. The SD card that came with the Duet Maestro will include the basic folder structure needed for operation and the RRF Web Configurator will supply you with the necessary configuration files.
    • The SD card that came with the Duet Maestro will include the basic folder structure needed for operation and the RRF Web Configurator will supply you with the necessary configuration files.

    • Extract the zip file that you got from the Configurator and move the /sys folder onto the SD card, replacing any files that already exist.

    • If you ever need to format the SD card, it’s suggested that you use FAT32 with 64kb cluster size. For best results, it's suggested to use the SD Card Formatter. https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatt...

    • Further details on the SD card folder structure and the files contained in the /sys folder, see here: Firmware Overview

  14. We will need a menu structure for the LCD panel. There are a few user created options, and you can customize your own if you like. Duet 2 Maestro 12864 display menu system For this guide, we will be using the excellent menu system created by forum user mudcruzr found here: https://github.com/mudcruzr/Duet-Maestro...
    • We will need a menu structure for the LCD panel. There are a few user created options, and you can customize your own if you like. Duet 2 Maestro 12864 display menu system

    • For this guide, we will be using the excellent menu system created by forum user mudcruzr found here: https://github.com/mudcruzr/Duet-Maestro...

    • Download the repository from github and extract the files into the /menu folder of the SD card, replacing any files that are already there.

  15. The Duet Web Control is the web interface used by RepRapFirmware. The website files need to be placed on the SD card. The SD card from the factory should contain a somewhat recent version of the DWC files in the /www folder.
    • The Duet Web Control is the web interface used by RepRapFirmware. The website files need to be placed on the SD card.

    • The SD card from the factory should contain a somewhat recent version of the DWC files in the /www folder.

    • Because we will be upgrading the firmware as part of this guide, we want to ensure that the version of the DWC files on the SD card matches our firmware version.

    • Download the DuetWebControl-1.22.6.zip file from here: https://github.com/dc42/RepRapFirmware/r...

    • Extract the zip file into /www folder on the SD card and replace the existing files.

  16. The Duet board will come from the factory with a recent firmware version installed already, but as part of this guide we will go through the process of updating it so that we have a known stable recent version.
    • The Duet board will come from the factory with a recent firmware version installed already, but as part of this guide we will go through the process of updating it so that we have a known stable recent version.

    • Download the Duet2Firmware-2.02b.zip file from here: https://github.com/dc42/RepRapFirmware/r...

    • Extract it and copy the DuetMaestroFirmware.bin, iap4e.bin, and iap4s.bin files into the /sys folder on the SD card.

  17. Now that we've copied the config files from the configurator, the web control interface files, menu system files, and firmware files, we are ready to power on the Duet Maestro for the first time.
    • Now that we've copied the config files from the configurator, the web control interface files, menu system files, and firmware files, we are ready to power on the Duet Maestro for the first time.

    • When you’re finished copying all the files and folders, safely eject the SD card from your computer system, and place the SD card into the Maestro.

    • A micro USB cable is now required to connect the Duet Maestro to your computer.

    • The next step is to connect to the Maestro via USB and terminal software like YAT or Printrun/Pronterface.

  18. The next step is to connect to the Maestro via USB and terminal software like Printrun.
    • The next step is to connect to the Maestro via USB and terminal software like Printrun.

    • Download and install Printrun: https://www.pronterface.com/#download

    • Connect a micro USB cable between your PC and the Duet.

    • Launch Printrun, select the port, and click connect.

    • Send M115 to get the current version of installed firmware and verify that the board is responding.

    • Send M997 S0 to update the firmware.

    • The board will reboot after installing the firmware. Wait a minute and reconnect.

    • Next send M552 to get the currently assigned DHCP IP address and write it down.

  19. The final step is to test the network connection to the Duet Maestro and the Duet Web Control.
    • The final step is to test the network connection to the Duet Maestro and the Duet Web Control.

    • Disconnect the USB cable, apply direct power from the PSU.

    • Enter the IP address we obtained from the last step into your browser address bar, which should load the Duet Web Control interface.

Finish Line

4 other people completed this guide.

Jason Znack

Member since: 06/16/2018

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