Skip to main content

Site Navigation

Your Account

Choose Language

Introduction

The following is an update to the previous Ender 3 Duet Maestro conversion guide, this time focusing on the newly released Duet 3 Mini 5 + and RepRapFirmware 3. To learn more about the Mini5+, see here. To learn more about RepRapFirmware3, see here. For a more specific guide on upgrading from RRF2 to RRF3, see here (TBD). See here for a discussion thread on this guide where you can share your questions and feedback.

The goal of this guide is the same as before, to provide a guided on ramp to installing a Duet controller board using RepRapFirmware on a basic printer. The concepts shown will be specific to the Ender 3, but the techniques used are broadly applicable to all printer types. We will cover basic wiring, initial configuration, commissioning and testing, basic calibration, and finally, adding a RaspberryPi Single Board Computer (SBC), which is a new feature of the Duet 3 series boards.

The Creality Ender 3 has become a very popular low cost printer option. It's not without its downsides, however. Loud motors, drivers, and fans can be maddening, and the lack of a dynamic web interface and network connection makes interacting with it more painful than it needs to be. This is not to mention the lack of thermal runaway protection in the Creality build of Marlin.

However, the small build volume, smaller motors, and single extruder design is a perfect fit for the recently released Duet 3 Mini 5+ electronics board, which brings the power and flexibility of RepRapFirmware into a smaller, lower cost package, while still maintaining powerful and quiet Trinamic drivers, and allowing for future expandability via the CAN-FD bus and SBC connection.

The combination of low cost, but well built printer frame and suitable mechanics with the power and flexibility of the Duet and RepRapFirmware, work together to create a very affordable and capable machine.

  1. Once you have your Ender 3 pro up and running, you’ll want to plan out your upgrade path before taking it apart. At the very least you’ll need an adapter to mount the Duet 3 Mini 5+ board in the Ender 3 electronics enclosure. Download link: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:361268... You also have the option of replacing the enclosure entirely with something of your choosing. There are a few printable enclosure options on Thingiverse. Though if you go this route, you may need to extend some of the wiring. Next, go through the LCD menu and record certain details about the firmware settings, mainly axis length, steps per mm, acceleration, max speed, and jerk settings. This will be required when we use the RepRapFirmware Web Configurator to prepare our starting configuration files.
    • Once you have your Ender 3 pro up and running, you’ll want to plan out your upgrade path before taking it apart. At the very least you’ll need an adapter to mount the Duet 3 Mini 5+ board in the Ender 3 electronics enclosure. Download link: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:361268...

    • You also have the option of replacing the enclosure entirely with something of your choosing. There are a few printable enclosure options on Thingiverse. Though if you go this route, you may need to extend some of the wiring.

    • Next, go through the LCD menu and record certain details about the firmware settings, mainly axis length, steps per mm, acceleration, max speed, and jerk settings. This will be required when we use the RepRapFirmware Web Configurator to prepare our starting configuration files.

    • See here for a more detailed breakdown of what information is required and how to obtain it: Adapting an existing printer to Duet

    • Most of this information can also be found in the Marlin Configuration.h file. Your SD card from Creality may contain the Marlin files, and it can be downloaded from the Creality website or GitHub repository. Download link: https://www.creality3d.cn/download/sourc...

    • The 3rd photo shows the planned wiring connections we will be making. This will be a handy list when it comes time to create the config file using the online tool.

    • Other Useful Links. Duet 3 Mini 5+ Hardware overview and Duet 3 Mini 5+ Wiring

  2. See here for some optional upgrades possible with the Ender 3. Ender 3 Pro and Duet Maestro Guide Part 5: Upgrades
    • See here for some optional upgrades possible with the Ender 3. Ender 3 Pro and Duet Maestro Guide Part 5: Upgrades

    • These include a Z axis lead screw change, BLTouch Z probe, moving the Z axis endstop to the top for a Z max endstop used for power loss recovery, replacing the loud fans with quiet Noctuas, and adding an LED strip for better visibility.

    • Some of these upgrades will be shown in this guide like the fans, LEDs, BLtouch, and PanelDue, but others like buck converter, lead screw change, will not. So please do check out that guide if you're interested.

  3. First, we need to take the old Creality board out. Disconnect and remove the display from the frame. Then disconnect the Z end stop wire from the end stop. This will make the next steps easier. Now remove the screws holding the electronics enclosure together. Two on the front, two on top, and 3 underneath. Once the electronics enclosure is loose, you can take the base off and expose the board. Remove the 4 screws holding down the board to the plate. Set all the screws aside where you won’t lose them.
    • First, we need to take the old Creality board out. Disconnect and remove the display from the frame. Then disconnect the Z end stop wire from the end stop. This will make the next steps easier.

    • Now remove the screws holding the electronics enclosure together. Two on the front, two on top, and 3 underneath.

    • Once the electronics enclosure is loose, you can take the base off and expose the board. Remove the 4 screws holding down the board to the plate. Set all the screws aside where you won’t lose them.

  4. Creality has secured the plugs with a blob of hot glue as strain relief, which is nice, but kind of a pain in our case. Carefully use a small flat blade screw driver to pry the glue blob off the connector. In my case the glue wasn’t very strong and the connector came loose with a little prying. Before unplugging the connectors, make sure they are properly labeled and maybe take a picture to help identify where everything goes again for reassembly or if you ever wanted to revert back to the stock setup. Before unplugging the connectors, make sure they are properly labeled and maybe take a picture to help identify where everything goes again for reassembly or if you ever wanted to revert back to the stock setup.
    • Creality has secured the plugs with a blob of hot glue as strain relief, which is nice, but kind of a pain in our case. Carefully use a small flat blade screw driver to pry the glue blob off the connector. In my case the glue wasn’t very strong and the connector came loose with a little prying.

    • Before unplugging the connectors, make sure they are properly labeled and maybe take a picture to help identify where everything goes again for reassembly or if you ever wanted to revert back to the stock setup.

  5. Because the front plate of the enclosure doesn’t have the necessary cutouts for the Mini 5+, we’ll have to make some alterations. First test fit the Mini 5+ board and mark the inside of the front plate for where you need to cut. At minimum, you’ll need access to the Ethernet port, the SD card slot, and the micro USB connector, and a hole for the reset button. Optionally you may also want enough space for the ribbon cable between the Mini 5+ and at Raspberry Pi. You may also want to have some holes to see the status LEDs.
    • Because the front plate of the enclosure doesn’t have the necessary cutouts for the Mini 5+, we’ll have to make some alterations. First test fit the Mini 5+ board and mark the inside of the front plate for where you need to cut.

    • At minimum, you’ll need access to the Ethernet port, the SD card slot, and the micro USB connector, and a hole for the reset button.

    • Optionally you may also want enough space for the ribbon cable between the Mini 5+ and at Raspberry Pi. You may also want to have some holes to see the status LEDs.

    • I’ll leave it up to you how you modify the plate. In my case I used a drill and a rotary tool with a reinforced cutting wheel and a hacksaw to make a rough cut, and then used a file to clean up the edges.

    • The slot I cut is 70mm long, by 15mm tall, but you could be more selective in how much you cut out.

    • I unfortunately marred the front panel a bit with the hacksaw. Fortunately, this will be covered up by a Raspberry Pi case later on, so you won't actually see it at all.

  6. The bolt hole pattern for the stock Creality Ender board and the Duet Mini 5+ is different. An adapter plate is required. If the Ender is your only printer, be sure to print the adapter before disassembly. Attach the adapter mount to the plate using the 4 original screws. Then attach the Maestro to the mount using 4 6mm M3 screws. Use the clear plastic washers that came with the Mini 5+ in the bag of connectors.
    • The bolt hole pattern for the stock Creality Ender board and the Duet Mini 5+ is different. An adapter plate is required.

    • If the Ender is your only printer, be sure to print the adapter before disassembly.

    • Attach the adapter mount to the plate using the 4 original screws. Then attach the Maestro to the mount using 4 6mm M3 screws. Use the clear plastic washers that came with the Mini 5+ in the bag of connectors.

    • Download link for the adapter bracket: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:361268...

    • You may notice that this adapter is the same as the Maestro board, because the physical form factor is the same for the Mini 5+.

  7. Next, we will re-terminate the wires using the provided crimp connectors. How you connect the wires to the board is up to you, but in this case, we will be snipping off the existing connector, stripping the ends, and re-crimping a new connector that fits the Mini 5+ specifically. The only exception is the motor plugs, which we will modify slightly so they can plug into the Mini 5+ as is. Pay close attention to the orientation of the Creality plugs and the markings on the Creality board in order to preserve polarity of the connectors. Take out and sort the connector ends that came with the Mini 5+. You’ll need a crimping tool.
    • Next, we will re-terminate the wires using the provided crimp connectors. How you connect the wires to the board is up to you, but in this case, we will be snipping off the existing connector, stripping the ends, and re-crimping a new connector that fits the Mini 5+ specifically.

    • The only exception is the motor plugs, which we will modify slightly so they can plug into the Mini 5+ as is. Pay close attention to the orientation of the Creality plugs and the markings on the Creality board in order to preserve polarity of the connectors.

    • Take out and sort the connector ends that came with the Mini 5+. You’ll need a crimping tool.

    • Crimping Tool Thread 1

    • Crimping Tool Thread 2

    • How to Crimp Video

    • It can also be helpful to use the wiring diagram and details found here to help guide you.

    • Duet 3 Mini 5+ Wiring

  8. The Ender part cooling fan has the yellow (+) and blue (-) wires, and the hot end heatsink fan has unterminated bare red (+) and black (-) wires, and the case fan has a terminated red (+) and black (-) wires. The Mini 5+ has 4 low current connectors suitable for PWM controlled fans or LEDs. (Plus any number of always on fans connected directly to VIN) Out3, 4, 5, 6. The part cooling fan will plug into OUT3, the hot end fan into OUT4, and the case fan into OUT5, and LEDs into OUT6. OUT5 and OUT6 are 2 pin connectors. OUT3 and OUT4 are 4 pin connectors that can accomodate 4-wire fans with dedicated PWM and tachometer signals. We will use 2 wire fans which connect to V_OUTLC1 and OUT3- and OUT4- pins.
    • The Ender part cooling fan has the yellow (+) and blue (-) wires, and the hot end heatsink fan has unterminated bare red (+) and black (-) wires, and the case fan has a terminated red (+) and black (-) wires.

    • The Mini 5+ has 4 low current connectors suitable for PWM controlled fans or LEDs. (Plus any number of always on fans connected directly to VIN) Out3, 4, 5, 6.

    • The part cooling fan will plug into OUT3, the hot end fan into OUT4, and the case fan into OUT5, and LEDs into OUT6. OUT5 and OUT6 are 2 pin connectors. OUT3 and OUT4 are 4 pin connectors that can accomodate 4-wire fans with dedicated PWM and tachometer signals. We will use 2 wire fans which connect to V_OUTLC1 and OUT3- and OUT4- pins.

    • The voltage for these connectors is determined by a 3-pin jumper block labelled OUT 3&4 Select V. A jumper in the "left" position will power them from the fused VIN supply (max 2A each ). A jumper in the "right" position will power them from the onboard 12V regulator.

    • If you are using the stock 24v fans, leave the jumper set to the VIN selection. In our case the fans have been replaced with 12v versions, as you'll see in the following steps, so we would select the 12v jumper position.

    • Note, the draw limit for the internal 12v regulator is 800ma. Make sure that your combination of fans/LEDs etc is below 800ma. Otherwise you must use a buck converter to supply the center jumper block pin. Check your fan and LED specs to make sure. The limit for 24v VIN is 2A, so you need not worry.

    • For example, the case fan draws 50ma, hotend fan draws 50ma, part cooling fan draws 50ma, and the LEDs draw 160ma (20ma/segment X 8 segments) for a total draw of 310ma which is well within the limit of 800ma.

    • Further information on connecting fans can be found here on the wiki. Connecting and configuring fans If you do need more current, see here on adding a buck converter. Ender 3 Pro and Duet Maestro Guide Part 5: Upgrades

  9. The part cooling fan will connect to OUT 3, connected between the V_OULC1+ pin (+ve) and the OUT_n_NEG pin (-ve), also shown as OUT3- on the wiring diagram. The hotend heatsink fan will connect to OUT 4, connected between the V_OULC1+ pin (+ve) and the OUT_n_NEG pin (-ve), also shown as OUT4- on the wiring diagram.
    • The part cooling fan will connect to OUT 3, connected between the V_OULC1+ pin (+ve) and the OUT_n_NEG pin (-ve), also shown as OUT3- on the wiring diagram.

    • The hotend heatsink fan will connect to OUT 4, connected between the V_OULC1+ pin (+ve) and the OUT_n_NEG pin (-ve), also shown as OUT4- on the wiring diagram.

    • The case fan will connect to OUT 5, which only has 2 pins for + and -. Ensure you wire them to match for the fan polarity.

    • In addition to the fans, we will be adding an 12v LED strip light. The LED strip will connect to OUT 6, which only has 2 pins for + and -. Ensure you wire them to match for the LED strip polarity.

    • It can help to label the fan wires and write down the polarity and color for each fan since the Ender uses various colours.

  10. The stock Ender 3 fans are quite loud, so we will replace them with quieter 12v Noctua fans. This is made easy by the onboard 12v regulator on the Mini 5+ removing the need for an external buck converter. The replacement fan is a Noctua NF-A4x10. This is a 40mm x 40mm x 10mm fan capable of pushing a rated 4.8 CFM at a mere 18db. This same fan will be used for the hotend as well and is the same fan used on the Prusa MK3. The fan comes with a convenient way of splicing the fan to an existing connector which Noctua calls Omnijoin. This uses 3M Scotchlok terminals that create a physical and electrical butt splice connection between two pieces of wire.
    • The stock Ender 3 fans are quite loud, so we will replace them with quieter 12v Noctua fans. This is made easy by the onboard 12v regulator on the Mini 5+ removing the need for an external buck converter.

    • The replacement fan is a Noctua NF-A4x10. This is a 40mm x 40mm x 10mm fan capable of pushing a rated 4.8 CFM at a mere 18db. This same fan will be used for the hotend as well and is the same fan used on the Prusa MK3.

    • The fan comes with a convenient way of splicing the fan to an existing connector which Noctua calls Omnijoin. This uses 3M Scotchlok terminals that create a physical and electrical butt splice connection between two pieces of wire.

    • Simply use the included plug on one end, and snip the existing fan wire for the other end. Match black to black in one Scotchlok connector, and red to red in the other. Use plier to push down the button and lock them in place.

    • If you are not using Noctua fans and don't have the Scotchlok connectors, you can simply snip the ends and resplice new plugs or use a soldered butt joint to extend the wires of your fans.

    • The fan orientation in the first image has the fan blowing into the enclosure. Unfortunately, the grates on the enclosure greatly reduce the amount of airflow for the Noctua fans lower speed. Therefore the fan was flipped to draw air out of the enclosure. In order to keep wires clear of the blades a printed 40mm Fan Guard was added.

    • Alternatively, you could use a hand file to remove sections of the grates from the case plate to clear the path for the fan blades. Just be sure nothing is likely to enter the blades. Consider adding a less restrictive grate.

  11. Adding LED strips to the printer is a great way to make it easier to see what is going on with a print. With 4 PWM controlled outputs on the Mini 5+, we can connect a strip of 12v LEDs to shed some light on the print bed and control them with Gcode or with a slider in DWC. Conveniently, the LED strip is just the right size to fit inside the trench of the V slot extrusion at the top of the frame.
    • Adding LED strips to the printer is a great way to make it easier to see what is going on with a print.

    • With 4 PWM controlled outputs on the Mini 5+, we can connect a strip of 12v LEDs to shed some light on the print bed and control them with Gcode or with a slider in DWC.

    • Conveniently, the LED strip is just the right size to fit inside the trench of the V slot extrusion at the top of the frame.

    • The wire can be tucked in along the extrusion as well behind the wheel and down to the electronics enclosure. I used small pieces of electrical tape to keep it in place.

    • Make sure you note the polarity of the LED strip when you solder the wires and connect them to the right pins of the OUT6 port on the Duet.

    • In the next few steps we will be replacing the hotend shroud to add a BLTouch and replace the hotend fan and part cooling fan. Additionally we will add another short piece of LED strip to illuminate the nozzle. Both of these strips will be connected to the same fan terminal, ie wired in parallel.

  12. Using the same LED strip that went into the frame, I've cut off a group of 3 LEDs, soldered on a pair of wires, and used super glue to affix it to the bottom of the fan duct of the Hero Me. The wires for this LED strip will be wired into the same connector as the LED strip from the frame. To do this, I was able to crimp one wire and then carefully solder the second wire onto the pin. If you're careful with the solder you can still fit the crimped pin into the body.
    • Using the same LED strip that went into the frame, I've cut off a group of 3 LEDs, soldered on a pair of wires, and used super glue to affix it to the bottom of the fan duct of the Hero Me.

    • The wires for this LED strip will be wired into the same connector as the LED strip from the frame.

    • To do this, I was able to crimp one wire and then carefully solder the second wire onto the pin. If you're careful with the solder you can still fit the crimped pin into the body.

    • The LEDs are the green and blue wires plugged into the OUT6 port. The photo only shows both LED strips wired in parallel into the same connector.

    • Alternatively, if you don't care if the LEDs are controllable, you could get 24v LEDs and you can hook them up to VIN and ground so that they turn on when the printer is turned on.

  13. In order to use the BLTouch we need a way to mount it. There are some simple brackets available that work with the stock hotend assembly, but we also want to swap the fans and add an LED light strip, and improve the fan duct. Therefore, we'll be using the Hero Me mount which has numerous configuration options. HeroMe Ender3 Hotend Mount - I've printed the option with the BLTouch adapter, and the single 5015 fan duct. There are other alternatives for replacing the hotend shroud. You can even leave the stock shroud in place and just replace the fans. Start the disassembly by removing the 2 retaining bolts for the stock shroud and pulling it away. Be careful not to pull too hard on the hotend heater and thermistor wiring.
    • In order to use the BLTouch we need a way to mount it. There are some simple brackets available that work with the stock hotend assembly, but we also want to swap the fans and add an LED light strip, and improve the fan duct. Therefore, we'll be using the Hero Me mount which has numerous configuration options.

    • HeroMe Ender3 Hotend Mount - I've printed the option with the BLTouch adapter, and the single 5015 fan duct. There are other alternatives for replacing the hotend shroud. You can even leave the stock shroud in place and just replace the fans.

    • Start the disassembly by removing the 2 retaining bolts for the stock shroud and pulling it away. Be careful not to pull too hard on the hotend heater and thermistor wiring.

    • The hotend fan and part cooling blower can then be removed from the shroud. In our case these will be replaced and the wires can be cut as shown in the following step.

  14. We will be replacing the stock heat break fan with the same 40mm Noctua fan used for the electronics enclosure. We'll be using the same Scotchlok connectors that are included with the Noctua fan. Noctua packages spare Scotchlok connectors in case you make a mistake. But we're also going to use them to swap out the small 4010 blower fan for a larger, more powerful, but quieter 5015 blower fan from Sunon. Model MF50151V2-B00U-A99 The Scotchlok connectors allow us to reuse the existing wiring loom to connect the new fans.
    • We will be replacing the stock heat break fan with the same 40mm Noctua fan used for the electronics enclosure. We'll be using the same Scotchlok connectors that are included with the Noctua fan.

    • Noctua packages spare Scotchlok connectors in case you make a mistake. But we're also going to use them to swap out the small 4010 blower fan for a larger, more powerful, but quieter 5015 blower fan from Sunon. Model MF50151V2-B00U-A99

    • The Scotchlok connectors allow us to reuse the existing wiring loom to connect the new fans.

    • With the Hero Me installed and the fan wires connected we can next attach the noctua fan and the BLTouch to mount.

    • The same 40mm fan guard used in the electronics enclosure was used for the hotend fan.

    • After completing the swap of the cooling shroud it would be a good idea to re-run the PID tuning process for the hotend as described in the calibration guide.

  15. The BLTouch has 5 wires which need to be extended to the Duet board. (Technically 4 if you only extend a single ground.) You'll need 5 lengths of wire approximately 1 meter in length. You'll need some Dupont connectors and crimps, a crimper, wire stripper, and wire cutter. You'll also need the 5 pin Molex plug connector from the Duet connector package for the Z probe port. A length of nylon loom can help protect the wires and match the look of the stock hotend wiring loom.
    • The BLTouch has 5 wires which need to be extended to the Duet board. (Technically 4 if you only extend a single ground.)

    • You'll need 5 lengths of wire approximately 1 meter in length. You'll need some Dupont connectors and crimps, a crimper, wire stripper, and wire cutter. You'll also need the 5 pin Molex plug connector from the Duet connector package for the Z probe port.

    • A length of nylon loom can help protect the wires and match the look of the stock hotend wiring loom.

    • In our loom we will include an additional 2 lengths of wire to be used for a small LED strip. These two wires will be piggybacked onto the 2 wires from the LED strip used for the top frame.

  16. The BLTouch end of the wires will have male Dupont pins, and the Duet end will have female Molex. Adding a wrap of tape or blob of hot glue can help ensure the molex connectors stay together. Also ensure they have good strain relief at the hotend. The Duet Mini 5+ Z Probe port can accommodate all 5 of the BLTouch wires. Note that the 2 ground wires from the BLTouch can be piggybacked to the single Z probe connector in the same way as we did with the LED wiring to the always on fan plug.
    • The BLTouch end of the wires will have male Dupont pins, and the Duet end will have female Molex.

    • Adding a wrap of tape or blob of hot glue can help ensure the molex connectors stay together. Also ensure they have good strain relief at the hotend.

    • The Duet Mini 5+ Z Probe port can accommodate all 5 of the BLTouch wires. Note that the 2 ground wires from the BLTouch can be piggybacked to the single Z probe connector in the same way as we did with the LED wiring to the always on fan plug.

    • It's possible to leave the second BLTouch ground wire disconnected or connect it earlier to the other ground wire so that you only have ot route 4 long wires back to the board.

    • Note that on the Duet Wifi the wires must be split out between the Z Probe port and the expansion header.

    • It's a good idea to test your wires for continuity before completing the installation.

  17. I've used pieces of electrical tape to bind the wires together into a bundle to make them easier to feed into the nylon wrap. I've used velcro wrap to affix the new wiring loom to the existing hotend loom. At the Duet end, connect the BLTouch Molex KK plug to the io_3 port.
    • I've used pieces of electrical tape to bind the wires together into a bundle to make them easier to feed into the nylon wrap.

    • I've used velcro wrap to affix the new wiring loom to the existing hotend loom.

    • At the Duet end, connect the BLTouch Molex KK plug to the io_3 port.

    • The order of the pins on the io_3 port is a bit different than on the Duet Maestro Z Probe port, so the order of the wires will need to match, and will be shown next.

  18. The order of the BLTouch wires at the Duet end require that the two ground wires are connected to the same pin. This is the black and brown wire in the photo and matches the color of the BLTouch wiring. I used the same technique as described in the LED wiring for the hotend. A single wire is crimped to the pin, and the second wire is soldered carefully onto the pin. Note the 2 wires going into the one pin between the yellow and white wires. A piece of electrical tape was used to act as strain relief.
    • The order of the BLTouch wires at the Duet end require that the two ground wires are connected to the same pin. This is the black and brown wire in the photo and matches the color of the BLTouch wiring.

    • I used the same technique as described in the LED wiring for the hotend. A single wire is crimped to the pin, and the second wire is soldered carefully onto the pin.

    • Note the 2 wires going into the one pin between the yellow and white wires. A piece of electrical tape was used to act as strain relief.

    • io3 to BLTouch connections: Red is 5v for power, Yellow is io3.out for servo control, Black and Brown are ground wires and have been joined to a single pin, White goes to io3.in for trigger signal. The 3.3v pin is left blank.

    • Note that the 3rd photo shows the probe plugged into io_4, which isn't PWM capable and won't work. It's just to illustrate the plug orientation.

  19. The power supply leads and the bed heater will use the blue spade terminals. You will need a suitable crimper tool for these as well. The ends of the Ender 3 wires may be tinned, in which case it's best to snip the tinned section off and crimp the base wires.
    • The power supply leads and the bed heater will use the blue spade terminals. You will need a suitable crimper tool for these as well.

    • The ends of the Ender 3 wires may be tinned, in which case it's best to snip the tinned section off and crimp the base wires.

    • Note the polarity. Black (-) and red (+). Check for silkscreen markings on the PCB near the connectors and check the wiring diagram.

    • The bed heater will connect to the OUT_0 high current screw terminals. Due to the tight fit with the aluminum extrusion the forks of the spade terminal must be bent 90 degrees.

    • Be careful with the sharp edges of the cutout portion of the aluminum extrusion. Use a file to take down any sharp corners and add some electrical tape as a barrier. Also ensure proper strain relief to immobilize the wire bundle.

    • Further information on power supplies and bed heaters can be found here on the wiki. Choosing the power supply Choosing and connecting a bed heater Duet 3 Mini 5+ Wiring

  20. The hotend heater will connect to OUT_1 located in the corner of the board. Heaters do not have a polarity to worry about. The wires will need to be crimped for the larger 2-pin JST VH connectors.
    • The hotend heater will connect to OUT_1 located in the corner of the board. Heaters do not have a polarity to worry about.

    • The wires will need to be crimped for the larger 2-pin JST VH connectors.

    • Further information on hot end heaters can be found in the wiki.

    • Connecting extruder heaters

  21. The thermistors do not have a polarity, but you must connect them to the right place. The hotend thermistor connects to TEMP_1 The bed thermistor connects to TEMP_0
    • The thermistors do not have a polarity, but you must connect them to the right place.

    • The hotend thermistor connects to TEMP_1

    • The bed thermistor connects to TEMP_0

    • The Ender 3 thermistor connections are too short to reach the placement of the TEMP connectors on the Mini 5+ so they will need to be extended.

    • Re-crimping them with the proper locking connector will help ensure they are not easily pulled free. In my case I've used a male Dupont pin to connect the extension and will add a blob of hot glue to hold it in place. Adding a piece of wire with solder is another option.

    • Further information on thermistors can be found here on the wiki. Connecting thermistors or PT1000 temperature sensors

  22. The stepper motor connectors technically do not need to be re-crimped, however the ridges on the motor plugs that ensure they can only be plugged in one way to the Creality board need to be clipped off. A pair of side cutters works well. This has the advantage of saving a lot of time crimping as well as keeping all the wires in the correct order. However, it does have the disadvantage of no longer being keyed, so you must ensure they are plugged into the board the right way around.
    • The stepper motor connectors technically do not need to be re-crimped, however the ridges on the motor plugs that ensure they can only be plugged in one way to the Creality board need to be clipped off. A pair of side cutters works well.

    • This has the advantage of saving a lot of time crimping as well as keeping all the wires in the correct order. However, it does have the disadvantage of no longer being keyed, so you must ensure they are plugged into the board the right way around.

    • The side of the plug that you snipped the guides off will go towards the white pillar of the board connector. It may help to mark this side of the motor plug with a dot to help you keep track.

    • If the motor connections are plugged in the wrong way round, no damage to the electronics will occur, but the motors will run backwards. You'll either need to flip the plug or change the motor direction in software.

    • Note that if you do decide to re-crimp the ends, you must keep the phase pairs side by side, Do not cross the pairs, otherwise you can damage the drivers.

    • In this case I've used Driver0 for X, Driver1 for Y, Driver2 for Z, Driver3 for E, Driver4 empty. The order isn't critical because the assignments are defined in the config.

    • Further information on connecting motors can be found here on the wiki. Choosing and connecting stepper motors

  23. The end stop connectors will need to be redone. The Creality end stop switches have only two wires for signal and ground, but Mini 5+ generalized IO ports with 5 pins, so we will need to be careful that we use the right ones. We will use io_5, io_6, and io_2 for the X, Y, and Z Max endstop switches, and io_3 for the BLTouch. io_0 is reserved for a PanelDue which will be shown later. This endstop arrangement leaves some of the more capable ports open for future use. See here for the io port limitations: Duet 3 Mini 5+ Hardware overview
    • The end stop connectors will need to be redone. The Creality end stop switches have only two wires for signal and ground, but Mini 5+ generalized IO ports with 5 pins, so we will need to be careful that we use the right ones.

    • We will use io_5, io_6, and io_2 for the X, Y, and Z Max endstop switches, and io_3 for the BLTouch. io_0 is reserved for a PanelDue which will be shown later.

    • This endstop arrangement leaves some of the more capable ports open for future use. See here for the io port limitations: Duet 3 Mini 5+ Hardware overview

    • The main limitations to keep in mind are that a PanelDue 4-wire connection must use io_0, and io_4 is not suitable for BLTouch.

    • The Z endstop is using a 4 pin connector (io_2) and the X and Y endstops are using the 3 pin connectors (io_5 and io_6).

    • The endstops will be wired to the io.in and ground pins. It doesn't matter which wire goes to which pin since all the switch does is complete the circuit. Also note that the position of the io.in and gnd pins differs between the 4 and 3 pin ports.

    • If your endstops require a power source, connect the correct wire to either the 3.3v or 5v pins.

    • The next step will show the Z endstop being converted to a Z Max endstop for re-homing the Z axis for power loss recovery.

  24. The stock Ender 3 uses a simple endstop switch in the Z min position for homing the Z axis. The mount for the switch is adjustable by sliding it up and down the frame. Unfortunately, the Ender 3 bed will often by cupped and cause a dip in the center. When leveling the bed at the corners it may prevent the nozzle from touching the bed at the center. Removing the Z min endstop mount entirely will allow you to move the nozzle all the way down. Since we're about to install a BLTouch anyway, we may as well remove it. However, rather than just remove it entirely, we can move it to the top of the frame and use it as a Z max endstop which is useful for resuming after a power loss, since it will be impossible to use the probe to rehome the Z axis while a print object is still on the bed.
    • The stock Ender 3 uses a simple endstop switch in the Z min position for homing the Z axis. The mount for the switch is adjustable by sliding it up and down the frame. Unfortunately, the Ender 3 bed will often by cupped and cause a dip in the center. When leveling the bed at the corners it may prevent the nozzle from touching the bed at the center.

    • Removing the Z min endstop mount entirely will allow you to move the nozzle all the way down. Since we're about to install a BLTouch anyway, we may as well remove it.

    • However, rather than just remove it entirely, we can move it to the top of the frame and use it as a Z max endstop which is useful for resuming after a power loss, since it will be impossible to use the probe to rehome the Z axis while a print object is still on the bed.

    • Note the orientation of endstop mount as installed at the top of the frame. The switch will be triggered when the X axis extruder arm reaches the top. This may limit the amount of Z axis travel, but due to the bowden tube, and wiring harness, this is really the maximum viable travel anyway.

    • You'll need to extend the endstop wiring. I was able to tuck the wire into the frame extrusion underneath the wheel. I used a small piece of electrical tape to hold it in place. The other end of the wire extender plugs into the stock Z endstop wiring.

    • In my case I had a length of wire used for optical endstops that matched the plugs of the Ender 3. If you don't have something similar you may need to cut the plugs and re-crimp new ones.

    • Next we will change the config.g and homez.g to reflect the new endstop position.

  25. Lastly, we will need to connect the 12864 LCD board using the included ribbon cable as well as our additional ribbon cable. We will be using the EXP1 and EXP2 pin blocks on the Mini 5+ board to connect to EXP1 and EXP2 connector ports on the back of the Ender 3 12864 display PCB. If you are using two 10-way ribbon cables you will have to reverse the plastic shell of EXP1 and EXP2 on the LCD by pulling them off gently but firmly with a pair of pliers, rotating 180 degrees and then reinserting them on the pins. This will keep the pins aligned properly as the ribbon cable connectors are keyed. If you are using two 10-way ribbon cables you will have to reverse the plastic shell of EXP1 and EXP2 on the LCD by pulling them off gently but firmly with a pair of pliers, rotating 180 degrees and then reinserting them on the pins. This will keep the pins aligned properly as the ribbon cable connectors are keyed.
    • Lastly, we will need to connect the 12864 LCD board using the included ribbon cable as well as our additional ribbon cable. We will be using the EXP1 and EXP2 pin blocks on the Mini 5+ board to connect to EXP1 and EXP2 connector ports on the back of the Ender 3 12864 display PCB.

    • If you are using two 10-way ribbon cables you will have to reverse the plastic shell of EXP1 and EXP2 on the LCD by pulling them off gently but firmly with a pair of pliers, rotating 180 degrees and then reinserting them on the pins. This will keep the pins aligned properly as the ribbon cable connectors are keyed.

  26. Once the connectors are flipped, plug in the two 10-way ribbon cables. And finally, reattach the LCD. It may help to label the ends of the 10-way cables so you know which is EXP1 and which is EXP2. Part 2 of this guide will cover the configuration needed to get the LCD working. For now, moving on to finish up the wiring.
    • Once the connectors are flipped, plug in the two 10-way ribbon cables.

    • And finally, reattach the LCD. It may help to label the ends of the 10-way cables so you know which is EXP1 and which is EXP2.

    • Part 2 of this guide will cover the configuration needed to get the LCD working. For now, moving on to finish up the wiring.

  27. The 12864 LCD and rotary encoder that comes with the Ender 3 is a functional if basic way of interacting with the printer directly without using the web interface. However, if you want more control, easier access to macros, access to a gcode console and keyboard, and don't have a computer nearby, the PanelDue makes for an excellent addition to any Duet powered printer. The case and mount chosen for the PanelDue 5i has an adjustable arm and will require some M4 hardware. It can be found here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:279962...
    • The 12864 LCD and rotary encoder that comes with the Ender 3 is a functional if basic way of interacting with the printer directly without using the web interface.

    • However, if you want more control, easier access to macros, access to a gcode console and keyboard, and don't have a computer nearby, the PanelDue makes for an excellent addition to any Duet powered printer.

    • The case and mount chosen for the PanelDue 5i has an adjustable arm and will require some M4 hardware. It can be found here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:279962...

    • The PanelDue is connected via the 4-wire cable option. This doesn't allow for the PanelDue SD card slot, but it does allow for a much longer and easier to route cabling option compared to the flat 10-wire ribbon cable.

    • The wires for the PanelDue are routed down the back of the frame extrusion inside the V slot channel and down into the electronics enclosure. A few pieces of electrical tape are enough to keep it in place.

    • Following the pinout of the PanelDue, we will connect to io_0 matching 5v, ground, and the transmit and receive pins.

    • For more information, see the main documentation for the PanelDue.

  28. Once you’ve got everything wired up you can reinstall the case onto the frame. Or if you did like me and left the case on the frame and wired everything up in place, now is a good time to route the cables and do some strain relief.
    • Once you’ve got everything wired up you can reinstall the case onto the frame.

    • Or if you did like me and left the case on the frame and wired everything up in place, now is a good time to route the cables and do some strain relief.

    • You may find it easier to disconnect some wires temporarily and reconnect them once it’s installed. It’s a tight fit, but it will all fit. I suggest leaving the 2 screws on the front loose and align and tighten the screw directly under the bed first.

    • For the VIN and bed wires you will need to bend the spade connector upwards to fit back onto the frame.

    • Once you’ve got all your wires reconnected, you can use some zip ties, etc., to provide some strain relief for the bundle leaving the case.

  29. Now reinstall the bottom plate with the case fan attached. It will take a little bit of wiggling to get the tab past the edge of the board. Once all the small screws are secured, you can finally tighten to two large screws on the front. The case fan is installed in the same orientation as it was originally which pulls air out of the case, which should be ideal as it will draw in fresh air through the grills right next to the driver chips. For the currents and loads being used on the stock Ender 3 Pro this should be adequate cooling.
    • Now reinstall the bottom plate with the case fan attached. It will take a little bit of wiggling to get the tab past the edge of the board. Once all the small screws are secured, you can finally tighten to two large screws on the front.

    • The case fan is installed in the same orientation as it was originally which pulls air out of the case, which should be ideal as it will draw in fresh air through the grills right next to the driver chips. For the currents and loads being used on the stock Ender 3 Pro this should be adequate cooling.

  30. This concludes the wiring guide.  The next guide will go through using the RepRapFirmware Web configurator to generate a config file set.
Finish Line

Jason Znack

Member since: 06/16/2018

3,838 Reputation

8 Guides authored

0 Comments

Add Comment

View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 1

Past 7 Days: 40

Past 30 Days: 93

All Time: 93